Ficklin’s Canary Club doesn’t ruffle enough feathers

Reviewed for Netgalley

Slipping into the 1920s in this period piece was a nice change of setting from everything I’ve read lately. I immediately enjoyed the descriptions of Manhattan as Benny walked its streets after getting out of prison. The scenery came alive with author Sherry Ficklin’s descriptions of the sights and sounds, the people and places, and the lingo of those prohibition days. I liked Benny too. A guy who wouldn’t have any luck if he didn’t have bad luck is the type of underdog many readers like to root for.

On the other hand, I did not care for Masie at all. It really annoys me when a character talks about how bad she is or how dark she is, but there is no evidence to support this. So she calls her former friend to beat up the guy who beat up her best friend? So, what? That does not make her a dark, twisted individual. Her need to be with Benny so he can make her a good person was not believable to me.

The most important part of any romantic story isn’t the plot or the setting, it’s the romance. If the relationship isn’t captivating then the overall story line won’t be either. This book needed a Rose and Jack or a Clary and Jace. Instead, it had Masie and Benny, two characters who have no chemistry and whose instant attraction leaves no room to develop a believable romance. When you aren’t invested enough in the relationship between the main characters, it’s hard to care whether they get a happily ever after.

Unfortunately, my overall feeling about the story was that it was just so-so. Once Benny and Masie’s relationship started to heat up, my enthusiasm for the story cooled down. Plot wise, everything became a little too cookie-cutter for me. Nothing surprising happened. This felt like a story I have read a dozen times before. New background, new character names, same old story. I kept hoping something refreshing and unexpected would happen. Like, maybe Masie would kill her father and take the family business for her own (now that would be dark and twisted) or maybe Daddy’s hired killer would carry out his plan and leave Benny with nothing but emptiness and vengeance. That also did not happen. No, the whole story dissolved into an underdeveloped plot to help the canary escape her cage. The ending was wrapped up in way too neat packaging and tied off with a tiny little bow that left me wanting a lot more.

The epilogue left things open for a sequel, but there simply wasn’t enough to The Canary Club to interest me in reading more. If you want a cut and dry love story, I think you’ll enjoy this book. If you want more, this is not the story for you.

 

The Canary Club, Sherry D. Ficklin, Crimson Tree Publishing, October 19, 2017

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